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    TheCellist.com
    Daniel Müller-Schott

    CD-Kritiken

    „He plays wide, beautifully, without
    drowning the winding outlines of
    these monologues.” Diapason

    Beethoven Vol1
    Instrumental & chamber
    Exceptional
    Editor's Choice

    GRAMOPHONE EDITOR'S CHOICE

    'Daniel Müller-Schott and Angela Hewitt give Beethoven's first three cello sonatas a nimble and colorful outing … Their duo engagement is compelling and their repertoire of gestures … is exceedingly broad … The recorded sound is beautifully balanced'

    Gramophone

    'The success of this duo partnership is very evident in this first volume of Daniel Müller-Schott and Angela Hewitt's Beethoven cycle. They respond with imagination and flexibility to Beethoven's mercurial changes of mood, one moment tender and reflective, then bold and dynamic … A first class release'

    BBC Music Magazine

    'Müller-Schott's playing is strong and vibrant … Hewitt brings her characteristic digital dexterity and sparkling articulation to bear … The performances certainly make one look forward to their second disc'

    International Record Review

    'Here we are then, at the launch of a wonderful musical adventure, with the outstanding and exquisitely soulful young cellist Danel Müller-Schott, partnered by the wondrous Angela Hewitt at her most sparkling, pristine, warm and flawlessly penetrating in very superior accounts of the two opus 5 sonatas and the opus 69 in A Major … A major collaboration'

    Glasgow Herald

    'The whole recital is characterised by exquisite phrasing, clean lines and, best of all, an expressiveness that borders on the sublime'

    BBC Online

    'Müller-Schott has a superbly eloquent and deliciously burnished tone, as nicely done as any I have ever heard… Angela Hewitt proves the perfect partner in this music with a sensitive and leading-when-necessary role that makes for a grand coupling. These might be the premiere Beethoven Cello Sonatas recordings when they are completed--this one is that good'

    Audiophile Audition, USA

    “The disc collects the two Op 5 sonatas and the magnificent Op 69; cherish it most for the players’ teasing exchanges, for Hewitt’s nimble fingers and Müller-Schott’s golden warmth.”

    G.Brown, The Times November 7, 2008

    “The disc collects the two Op 5 sonatas and the magnificent Op 69; cherish it most for the players’ teasing exchanges, for Hewitt’s nimble fingers and Müller-Schott’s golden warmth.”

    G.Brown, The Times November 7, 2008

    Classical CD of the week: Beethoven

    Sensitive: Daniel Müller-Schott

    With his Op 5, Beethoven virtually invented the classical cello sonata. While the young keyboard lion ensured that there was plenty of scope for his own virtuosity, these are true democratic sonatas that brilliantly exploit the cello's declamatory and lyrical powers. More than a decade later came the glorious A major Sonata Op 69, a less flamboyant yet far more subtle work, with an unforgettable opening for cello alone. The closely matched duo of Daniel Müller-Schott and Angela Hewitt do full justice to the A major Sonata's agitated and cussed side, both in the first movement's troubled development and in the fiercely articulated scherzo. But from Müller-Schott's mellow, nobly intoned opening, their performance is memorable above all for its lyrical tenderness and acute sensitivity to harmonic flux. They vindicate their expansive tempo in the finale's initial adagio with their eloquent phrasing and delicacy of interplay, while in the following allegro they balance grace (taking to heart Beethoven's many dolce markings) and quivering energy. Angela Hewitt's glistening, finely articulated passagework is a delight, here and elsewhere. In the two early sonatas the duo can sometimes underplay the music's explosiveness and comic brio. In both finales, especially, I could have done with bolder, brasher dynamic contrasts, and fewer fastidiously tapered phrase endings from Hewitt. But if the impulsive sansculotte emerges slightly tamed - Mozartified, if you like - these are performances of great finesse and musical insight, whether in No 2's hushed, brooding slow introduction, or the excursion to mysterious remote keys in the first-movement coda of No 1. The players write about the sonatas in the booklet as persuasively as they perform them.

    Richard Wigmore, Telegraph Oktober 2008